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Natural Minor Scales – The Other Side of Piano Scales

When most people think about piano scales, they’re usually thinking about the majors scales. But there is another side to this musical story: natural minor scales. Fortunately, if you know all twelve major scales, learning the natural minor scales will be easy!

To form a natural minor scale, you simply use this pattern:

Click Here And Learn How To Play Natural Minor Scales!

  • whole-step
  • half-step
  • whole-step
  • whole-step
  • half-step
  • whole-step
  • whole-step

In the above example, the Natural minor scale is A Minor. But by using this pattern, you can construct natural minor scales from any point on the piano.

The Major and Minor Scale Relationship

Did you notice that the natural A minor scale is like a shifted C Major scale? Well, that’s no accident…

Did you know that the major and minor scales are related? No, not like you cousin Bob. They are related in that you can find the relative minor scale of any major scale simply by locating the sixth note (or degree) in that major scale.

For example in the C major scale, the sixth note is A (C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C); therefore the relative minor scale for C major is…drum roll, please…A Minor.

Ok…Your turn, what’s the relative of the G major scale…E Minor!

There you have it. The natural minor scales in a familiar nutshell

Click Here And Learn How To Play Natural Minor Scales!

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